Omnivore Blade-Works

Omnivore Blade-Works is about functional art, with a concentration on quality and badassness.  Initially, we wanted to name all of our blades after omnivorous animals, and make them multifunctional, but it was quickly discovered that there are too many cutting jobs and so we needed more designs to fit different categories of work. Because of this, we have a separate category for tomahawks and for blades that are designed to be downright scary (Predator series).

Our Ursus series consists of more American-styled bowie knives (“Americanas”, “Horribilis”, and “Arctos” and a bushcraft/fighting knife called “Parvus”, which means insignificant or small.  We will be adding one more blade to this series this year (possibly named “Teddy”), which will serve as a game processing blade and/or neck knife for every day carry.

The Corvidae series is composed of daggers and double edged, mostly symmetrical short swords.   Starting from small to large we have: Palm Crow, Baby Crow, Crow, Raven, Corvid, Murder.

The Tanuki series of blades is inspired by the Japanese blades Tanto, Wakisashi and Katana.  The idea is to make modern utilitarian cutting tools that handle about the same as the originals, so those who practice Kenjutsu can have a familiar tool they can feel confident about using for chopping down trees or defending themselves without putting their more expensive, collectible blades at risk.

The Predator blades are named after the scariest or efficient predators throughout history.  Starting with the iMamba tomahawk, we embraced the darker side of blade making, and began thinking about how to make tools that would be most efficient for cutting down two legged opponents instead of trees.  These designs are primarily meant to be weapons, and while they are capable of utilitarian work, it should be understood that they are inherently more dangerous because of their geometry, and beg to be used for nefarious purposes.  I’ve been told that some weapons can absorb some of the energy of their makers. If that is true, then these blades would have souls that are efficient, merciless, and see no shades of grey.

The galleries below are intended to demonstrate some of the design process, so you can see some of the ways we decide how to improve our products, or eliminate ideas that don’t work.

Destructive and/or extreme duty testing:

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